INDEPENDENT AWARD WINNING GALLERY

Just Released Impressions of London by Alexander Millar

A stunning new collection from Alexander Millar is sure to sell out this summer. Robert Power of The Artmarket Gallery comments this is another "Very occasionally in the art world, one is privileged to witness history in the making."  
A stunning new collection from Alexander Millar is sure to sell out this summer. Robert Power of The Artmarket Gallery comments this is another "Very occasionally in the art world, one is privileged to witness history in the making."  Alexander Millar and his evolution as an artist over the past three years is one such occasion.Millar, an entirely self-taught artist began his career more than twenty years ago, painting watercolours and taking inspiration from landscape artist Ashley Jackson. But it is arguably in the last three years that Alexander Millar has started to become one of the most significant artists of the contemporary art world.  Starting in 2010, Millar was invited to exhibit at the Great North Museum: Hancock in Newcastle; an exhibition which took Millar’s work to new heights. His skilful depiction of buildings, cranes, viaducts and docks which dominate the characters walking or cycling past. These elements of ‘real life’ were increasingly present in the scenes, and he expertly began to pull the story away from single figure or couples, the dads with kids and dogs; to create the big picture, the context.  Being hailed as the Lowry of the north-east by respected art critic Sue Steward was just the beginning for Millar. Following his revered ‘Working Man’ exhibition in Newcastle, Millar went on to exhibit a series of work devoted to the working men and women of Sheffield and its steel industry presenting this work at the Magna Trust, a museum on the site of Templeborough Steelworks.  Now painting towards another major museum show, this collection of London scenes marks a juncture in Millar’s work, as he transitions from ‘gadgie-man’ to an artist who is drawing comparisons to Lowry, Turner and Monet.